Monday, October 12, 2009

Rosenberg v. SAG: Court of Appeal Implies Appeal May be Moot

Alan Rosenberg is no longer president of SAG, nor even a national board member, but his lawsuit against his own union drags on pointlessly. Believe it or not, he’s still trying to undo Doug Allen’s firing, the appointment of David White, the ratification of the TV/theatrical contract and, no doubt, the discovery of a new ring around Saturn. That last is probably a particularly bitter blow for the ex-president.

Rosenberg and his fellow Membership First plaintiffs 1st VP Anne-Marie-Johnson and board members Diane Ladd and Kent McCord might see some reason to continue the charade, but the Court of Appeal is apparently more skeptical: in a one-paragraph letter to counsel last week, the court asked both sides’ lawyers to be prepared to discuss at oral argument whether the appeal is moot, given that the SAG board reaffirmed Allen’s dismissal and White’s appointment, and the membership at large ratified the TV/theatrical agreement.

The oral argument in this farce is set for a week from tomorrow, October 20, but regardless of what happens, the case continues in the trial court — unless, perhaps, that judge, as well as the appellate judges, can be persuaded that courts have better things to do than try to madly shove toothpaste back into an already discarded tube.


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1 comment:

  1. Are charade and farce actual legal concepts?